We’ve Moved (Again!)

Due to a growing Clinical and Administrative team and the desperate need for more space to better meet the needs of our patients, we’re on the move again! Boston Psychiatric Care’s new office is now located at 233 Needham Street in the bustling Newton Highlands area. To find our office, use the elevator to go to the 4th floor to suite 404E. Our new office is handicap accessible and includes free parking in the building’s garage. To help you find our office look for the Bank of America sign out front directly across from Starbucks Coffee and Boston Soup Factory.

ADHD Neuropsychological Testing

Now Available in office at BPC

Boston Psychiatric Care has now implemented the use of QbTest, one of the widest FDA cleared medical device that provides objective data for diagnosing and treating ADHD for patients ages 6-60.

We are excited to make this amazing technology available to our patients and the patient’s of our colleagues.

The evidence-based testing performed in our clinic is different than traditional testing that you may have seen or have familiarity with. Our practice uses QbTest to increase safety, improve the quality of care we can provide our patients, enhance our assessment visits for initial evaluation of ADHD symptoms and to help measure how our patients are responding to treatment that has been prescribed by their provider.

QbTest involves a 15 to 20 minute, nonverbal, continuous performance test that appears on the
computer. QbTest is a computer assisted attention and impulse control task and simultaneous
recording of activity using an infrared camera for very precise motion measurements. The results are
then compared to an age and gender matched normative group, and are then incorporated into the
clinical interview and rating scales to reach a more accurate diagnosis. If an ADHD diagnosis is
established, QbTest is used to help monitor the patient’s response to treatment, and aids our clinic in
achieving treatment optimization. If it is determined that you do have ADHD, follow up testing will be
required once treatment is prescribed.

We strive to individualize the care and treatment for our patients and our goal is to bring more objective
measures to the process of diagnosing and treating those with ADHD in our community. In our efforts to improve the quality of care for our ADHD patients, we are implementing objective testing throughout the treatment process to measure treatment efficacy to ensure you are getting the most out of your ADHD care. 

We encourage those interested to reach out to us if interested in viewing sample reports, clinical documentation, or learn to more about how we are working to improve our patients’ outcomes and create a better view of ADHD.

If you are a clinician please click below to refer a patient for testing. There is no need to print. The form can be filled and sent electronically through our secure HIPPA compliant platform through Updox. Patient’s need not be receiving medication management at our clinic to be referred for testing. We are happy to provide reports to other prescribers and psychotherapists.

If you are a patient, please share this web page with your clinician so that they may provide you a referral. 

Referral for ADHD testing

(photo above of our Assistant Office Manager Keiana during our QBTest technician training)

Getting Closer to Personalized Medicine for Bipolar Disorder.

For patients living with Bipolar illness who have had several trials of medications (or cocktails of medications for that matter) without adequate response,  the devastation of one more medication that doesn’t do the trick can often lead to feelings of hopelessness.  Many patients give up on medication trials. Although I continue to see hope where they may not, I don’t blame them. It is the patient that waits that long month between visits.  They suffering through nuisance side effects, waiting for the medication to work, and joy at the thought that it is working only to fall into a depression the next week. For those that have struggled to find a medication that works, the process often contributes to the illness itself.  I explain to my patients that the field of Psychiatry is still a pseudoscience. It is not like breaking your leg. You can’t get an X-ray that definitively tells you what treatment you’ll need, and for exactly how many weeks.  But that’s all changing… Researchers in the fields of Psychiatry and Neuroscience are hard at work to increase the availability of objective data and testing for which prescribers can base their treatments off.  Lithium is a medication that can work wonders for those suffering from Bipolar disorder…or not at all.  Lithium requires slow titrations to a specific narrow therapeutic index, blood work, waiting, and more waiting. Many people brave through start up side effects and frequent trips to the lab in hopes of being rewarded for their patience and perseverance with relief.  Some, about 30%, will be, the other 70% will not.  In this piece, scientists explain how their research enables them to predict with 92% accuracy who those 30% will be. In addition to the contribution this type of research adds to patient’s treatment and well being, it may also provide a sense of validation for many patients.  Having objective reasons why a medication will work also helps to break down stereotypes about mental illness. If we have objective measures for treatments, that means there is something tangible that can be measured. This can help to remove the blame that patients so frequently place on themselves (or that others have placed on them for that matter). We are gaining speed on personalized medicine in Psychiatry which will hopefully open many new strategies to optimize patient treatment.

– Danielle Zito PMHCS BC

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Men and Loneliness

It’s a topic we don’t often hear spoken about.  It shouldn’t be too surprising though that it’s kept under the radar. Men in the United States are often socialized to keep their emotions to themselves. This makes it difficult to reach out to others, especially other males. In my practice, I often hear men describe not having other males to talk with and that they struggle to develop new friendships with other men. This is especially true after they enter the working world. On top of this social handicap, the pressures of work and other responsibilities add another layer of difficulty.  A friend of mine recently posted this article written by Mark Greene on The Good Men Project website. It gives us some useful insight on the topic.

–  Danielle Zito PMHCS BC

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Contact Information

If you are interested in learning more about our practice, please don’t hesitate to call 617-830-1644 or email info@bostonpsychiatriccare.com (Please be aware email is not a secure form of communication).

We are located at:

233 Needham St suite 404E

West Roxbury, MA 02132

(Across from Starbucks and Boston Soup Factory)

Our Main Office Phone and secure voicemail is:
617-830-1644

Our Secure Fax Number is:
617-404-9365

Free parking is available

We are wheelchair accessible

Welcome to our new webpage!

Welcome to Boston Psychiatric Care’s new website design! We are working to bring new features to the website to help make your experience with us even better! In the meantime, please forgive us as we work out details.  If a link is inactive or a page not found, please bring it to our attention.  Updates are in the works!

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